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Sports Betting For Beginners – Understanding the Numbers

There is nothing in the world more popular than sports. In every culture, sports makes up a major part of our identity. They have the ability to unite us, to excite us, and for some fans they even offer a chance at monetary gain.UFABET

When we talk money we are talking, of course, about sports betting. Wagering on sports is a time honored tradition in countries around the world. It can be as simple as betting a friend a beer that your team will beat his, or as complicated as you want to make it.

In this article, we are going to outline some tips and information for those who are just starting to bet on sports. We can’t all be expert punters right away, so it’s worth it to read up and build a solid foundation before you start betting on a regular basis.

Sports betting tip for beginners

Before we get to anything else, let’s talk about your bankroll. Too many beginning sports punters get over their heads when it comes to the money they play with. When you are just starting out, be mindful of your budget. Don’t ever bet more than you can afford to lose, either in a day or over the course of a season. It will take you at least a season to become familiar with sports betting, and until then you will come out negative as far as the spending scale. So start out small!

Understanding the numbers

Sports books, or the businesses who make the odds, take your money, and pay out winning bets, use specific layouts when presenting betting information. All the books keep this information the same, so that once you learn to read the numbers in sports betting you can bet at any book.

For team sports, all bets are laid out based on $100. If there is a negative sign in front of the amount, that is how much money you will need to bet in order to win $100 if your team wins. So, the line (the money amount) may read -170. This will mean that in order to win $100, you have to pay $170 (and of course the team you bet on has to win).

If an amount has a positive sign in front of it, that indicates how much money you can win on a $100 bet. Betting on a team with a +110 beside it will mean that you will win $110 for every $100 that you bet.

What about favorites?

In the examples we used above, the favorite team is the one with the negative sign in front of it. Most people new to sports betting make one or two common mistakes when it comes to favorites:

oBelieving that “favorite” indicates chances of winning: Having a team listed as a favorite does not mean that they are the better team, necessarily. All it says is that more people are betting on that team than the other team, known as the underdog.

oPicking your favorite: Almost all new sports bettors make the mistake of betting with their hearts instead of their heads. If you love a team, it’s best never to bet on games involving that team.

In sports betting, it will always cost more money to bet on the favorite. This is because the sports books want to balance the action, or get people to bet on both sides. That way, they stand to make more money.

Two final rules

To close up this article, let’s take a look at two important rules if you want to have a good experience in your first year of sports betting.

First of all, only bet on sports you really know well. If you don’t understand the rules or know the teams and players, you don’t have much of a shot at winning.

Second, for your first year at first, try to stay away from betting on the spread. It can be hard, because point spreads seem like simple wagers. However, making the straight up bet on a team to win that money lines offer gives an inexperienced bettor an increased shot of winning; it’s a safer way to get your sports betting education!

Hi my name is Shirley Durling and I am a sport betting enthusiast. I write articles and review products and services related to Sports Betting Systems and Sports Book’s. Please see my blog at Sport Betting Store  for more great information on sports betting.

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Electric and Hybrid Cars – The Wave of The Future

It seems like we’ve been waiting forever for electric cars to come along, but after more false starts than you’ll see at the London Olympics this year, it looks like the electric car is finally here to stay.junkyards near me

Now, we need to start with some boring terminology: A true electric car (EV, for Electric Vehicle) has no petrol engine as backup, so you are reliant on the batteries having enough charge to get you to where you need to go. The Nissan Leaf is the best-known (and best) electric car currently on sale.

regular hybrid uses an electric motor and/or a petrol motor, depending on the circumstances. You don’t plug it into a wall socket as the batteries charge while you are driving. A typical journey, even a short one, will use both electric and petrol power to drive the wheels. The Toyota Prius is the most popular and best-known hybrid on sale around the world.

plug-in hybrid, “range-extending” electric car, is technically more of a fancy hybrid than a true EV although it drives more like an EV than a regular hybrid. In practice it might be a huge difference or none at all, depending on how you use the car. A range-extender, or plug-in hybrid as it’s more commonly known, has a petrol engine which can be used to power the electric motor once the batteries have drained, but the petrol engine does not directly drive the wheels*. The Vauxhall Ampera/Chevrolet Volt twins are the leading example of this type of car, and they claim an urban fuel consumption of 300mpg (yep, that’s three hundred. Not a typo!)

A car running on an electric motor is usually very quiet (eerie silence or a distant hum instead of a clearly audible petrol engine) and smooth (no vibrations from engine or gearbox). The response from the car away from rest is both immediate and powerful, as electric motors generate huge amounts of torque instantly. They’re quiet from the outside to, to such an extent that the EU is considering making audible warnings compulsory in the future as pedestrians simply won’t hear an electric car coming.

In terms of exciting handling, electric cars are usually not brilliant, it must be said. They tend to be very heavy and usually run tyres & wheels more beneficial for economy than handling. But as a commuter vehicle around town, they are zippy and efficient. Plus they generate less noise, heat and pollution into the street so a traffic jam of Nissan Leafs in the city would be a lot more pleasant for passing pedestrians.

The batteries on a typical electric car only give it enough range for a few miles (although a true EV will have a bigger battery pack as it doesn’t have to fit a petrol engine & fuel tank as well), so the cars use various means to charge the battery while driving. Usually this involves converting kinetic energy from coasting and braking to electric energy to store in the batteries. The Fisker Karma even has solar cells in its roof to charge the batteries as well.

However, a longer journey will inevitably mean that the batteries are drained. In a fully electric car that means you have to stop and charge the batteries, so hopefully you parked near a power socket somewhere and have several hours to find something else to do. In a hybrid, the petrol engine will start up to provide the power. In a regular hybrid like a Prius, the car effectively becomes an ordinary petrol car, albeit with a fairly underpowered engine pushing a heavy car around so it’s not swift. In a ‘range extender’ like the Ampera/Volt, the petrol engine provides energy to the electric motor to drive the wheels, which is more efficient in both performance and economy. Depending on how you’re driving, any spare energy from the petrol engine can be used to charge up the batteries again, so the car may switch back to electric power once charging is complete.

So what does this mean in the real world?

Well, how much of the following driving do you do? We’re assuming here that the batteries are fully charged when you set off.

Short trips (<50 miles between charges).

These sort of journeys are ideal for electric cars and plug-in hybrids, as the batteries will cope with the whole journey and also get some charge while you drive. A regular hybrid will still need to use the petrol engine, although how much depends on how you drive it and how much charging it is able to get along the way.

Medium trips (50-100 miles between charges).

These are the sorts of trips that give EV drivers plenty of stress, as the traffic conditions may mean you run out of juice before you make it to your charging point. A plug-in hybrid or regular hybrid will be fine because they can call on the petrol engine. In a regular hybrid, this means the car will be petrol powered for most of the journey. In a plug-in hybrid, it will be mainly electric with the petrol engine kicking in to top up the batteries if needed late in the journey.

Longer trips (100+ miles between charges)

Not feasible in a fully-electric car, as you will almost certainly run out of electricity before you get there. The regular hybrid is basically a petrol car for almost the whole journey and the plug-in hybrid is majority electric but supplemented by petrol in a far more efficient way than a regular hybrid.

The pros and cons:

Let’s summarise the three types of electrically-powered cars:

Regular hybrid (eg – Toyota Prius)

PROS: cheaper, no charging required, no range anxiety, regular petrol engine makes it feel like a regular petrol car

CONS: only very short journeys (a few miles at best) will be fully electric, small battery pack and weak petrol engine means relatively poor performance compared to a normal petrol car or a fully electric car, poor economy when driven hard (like most Prius minicabs in London…), not very spacious for passengers and luggage due to carrying petrol and electric powertrains in one car

Fully electric car (EV) (eg – Nissan Leaf)

PROS: powerful electric motor gives much better performance than a regular hybrid, larger battery pack means longer electric running, no petrol engine reduces weight and frees up a lot of space, £5000 government rebate, electricity is cheaper and usually less polluting than petrol, privileged parking spaces in certain public places

CONS: Still expensive despite rebate, minimal range capability due to lack of petrol engine backup, resulting range anxiety is a real issue for drivers, question marks over battery life, technology advances will make next generation massively better and hurt resale value, some driving adaptation required, lengthy recharging required after even a moderate drive